• | Brookings Institute

    Over the last decade, nearly every state in the U.S. implemented major reforms to its teacher evaluation systems. These reforms sought to use evaluation for two purposes: 1) to inform personnel decisions, such as rewarding highly effective teachers and removing ineffective ones, and 2) to provide feedback to teachers to help them improve their practice. The idea was appealing—two birds, one stone.

    But new evidence undermines that idea. A recent  study by Alvin Christian and me suggests that new evaluation systems have not been able to produce high-quality evaluation feedback at scale. Providing feedback to teachers is a worthy investment, but we suspect it would be more effective to focus the evaluation system on career decisions and provide the most formative feedback outside of the evaluation process.


  • | Annenberg Learner

  • | The Research Partnership for Professional Learning

  • | Toda @Brown

    Share your department's work while engaging high school students during College Day at Brown, on Thursday, April 14, 2022!

    This immersive one-day program will bring about 200 local high school students to campus to introduce or further expose them to the world of higher education.


  • | The 74

    During the two years that COVID-19 has upended school for millions of families, education leaders have increasingly touted one tool as a means of compensating for lost learning: personalized tutors. As a growing number of state and federal authorities pledge to make high-quality tutoring available to struggling students, a new study demonstrates positive, if modest, results from an experimental pilot that launched last spring. 


  • | Brown University

    In early January 2022, six faculty members from Brown were among 200 American scholars recognized by Education Week for their highly influential educational research. The annual Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings seek to spotlight United States researchers who did the most to shape educational practice and policy in the last year. Among those listed were Professor of Economics Emily Oster; Director of the Annenberg Institute for School Reform Susanna Loeb; Associate Professor of Education Matthew Kraft; Professor of Sociology Prudence Carter; Associate Professor of Education Policy Lindsay Page; and Associate Professor of Education John Papay


  • | The New York Times

    The online tutoring field is fairly new, and many companies said they either did not have data proving their program’s effectiveness, or were still collecting it. Several pointed to small studies from Britain and Italy showing promising results.

    But critics say online tutoring rarely matches up to in-person tutoring, and that only a few such services replicate strategies that research has shown to be most effective: a paid, trained tutor who has a consistent personal relationship with a student; sessions during the school day, so that students do not skip lessons; and at least three sessions per week.


  • | Education Week

    By John Papay

    Ensuring that research crosses the divide to practice has been a long-standing challenge in the academy. There is tremendous value in disseminating research broadly, as highlighted by the Edu-Scholar Rankings. To “move ideas from the pages of barely read journals,” as rankings creator Rick Hess writes, “into the real world of policy and practice” should be a goal of both scholars and educators.


  • | EdResearch for Recovery
    Today, Results for America and the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University released two new EdResearch for Recovery briefs by leading national experts highlighting evidence-based strategies to strengthen school counseling and improve teaching and learning through instructional coaching...

  • | Brookings
    State-level governance will offer opportunities and challenges for educational progress in 2022. Education policy will be influenced by the substance and rhetoric in the electoral process across states throughout this year. Of the 36 gubernatorial races, at least five Republican incumbents and three Democratic incumbents have decided not to run for re-election. Fifteen states will hold elections for either the school chief, such as California and Arizona, or state board members, such as Ohio. Races for state legislators will determine the magnitude of single-party dominance, meaning one party has control over the governorship and the two chambers of the state legislature (aside from Nebraska, which has a unicameral legislature). Currently, the Republican Party and the Democratic Party dominate 23 and 15 state governments, respectively.

  • | Brookings
    High rates of teacher turnover are among the greatest barriers to building high-quality early childhood education (ECE) systems. In the United States, teachers working with the youngest learners turn over at much higher rates than those in the K-12 education system. For instance, our recent work shows that nearly half of child-care teachers in Louisiana leave their jobs from one year to the next. The pandemic made these already severe staffing challenges even worse. Center directors say they are struggling to keep and hire teachers and are therefore turning many families away.

  • | Education Week

    When considering how schools can best support middle and high schoolers struggling with either the foundational skills of reading or reading comprehension, experts point to a research-backed strategy that can help close academic gaps: high-impact tutoring.

    The term refers to an intensive form of tutoring that is offered through a school, is informed by data on individual students’ needs, aligns to classroom work, and can be effective in getting students to grade level faster. Yet few districts have been able to implement that kind of programming prior to the pandemic because of such challenges as cost and staff shortages. New federal relief funds are helping more districts explore the possibility.